Skip to content

Cleveland

Congratulations to Cleveland, TN, the 2014-15 SCI pilot year host! Cleveland submitted an outstanding proposal, with a collection of interrelated projects focused on the revitalization and re-use of the downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. The full proposal is available upon request.

The SCI has identified a set of fall, spring, and summer course matches for each of the below projects. Click on the project summary below or check out the graphic posters to find out more about the projects involved.

Project Summaries

Student Work Description: Within the SCI project, student work would involve the collection, mapping, and reporting of descriptive data on the storm water collection, treatment, and conveyance system, e.g. the size, location, and condition of catch basins, pipes, box culverts, etc. The project will involve the use of Microstation Geographics software and Microsoft Access to compile and map data using a Windows tablet and GPS and appropriate safety equipment.

Project Outcomes: Maps and Database: updated maps and database of Stormwater infrastructure, mainly in public ROW such as ditches, pipes, catch basins, etc. Database to include location, type, size, and condition of mapped stormwater infrastructure. Maps and data will support on-going efforts to sustain water quality.

UT Partner/Lead: Michael McKinney, Earth & Planetary Sciences

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Chris Broom, Stormwater Manager
Josh Holder, Stormwater Technician
Jonathan Jobe, Director of Development and Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will synthesize data and use the resulting needs analysis to inform Cleveland of the most effective strategies for gaining a true representation of citizen input with CIDAS.

Project Outcomes: Report: Needs for gaining “true representation” of citizen input; ethical issues in collecting, analyzing, storing, using, and presenting citizen input data; recommendations for collecting of citizen data including computer-based surveys, social media, and city hosted face-to-face events.

UT Partner/Lead: Lisa Yamagata-Lynch, Instructional Technology

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Corey Divel, Planner, Development & Engineering Services
Bryan Turner, Building Official, Development & Engineering Services
Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will design, develop and deploy the CIDAS system, a computer-based citizen input data acquisition system that allows data collection from citizens across a range of city services and facilities.

Project Outcomes: Computer Survey System/Platform: Allows for a static but systematic collection of data with citizen input across a range of city services and facilities; has a dynamic element with one or more modules for specific purposes to collect data from various populations; allows data collection on particular topics such as citizen choices when allocating finite funds.

UT Ideation Laboratory (iLAB) Partner/Lead: Xueping Li, Industrial and Systems Engineering

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Corey Divel, Planner, Development & Engineering Services
Bryan Turner, Building Official, Development & Engineering Services
Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will develop a Brand Brief for the City of Cleveland which captures the essence of Cleveland to be used for future projects. The brief can be used to identify consistent themes and elements to be used for various public projects ranging from signage to the development of public spaces.

Project Outcomes: City Brand Strategy and Brief and Visuals: A Brand Brief that meets the desired outcomes and objectives and outlines the City’s unique aspects and qualities, including its Vision, Mission, and Brand Equity (e.g.: Promise, Position and Personality) for a future Marketing Plan. Presentation of a variety of visual concepts and suggestions for how the brand strategy and brief can be played out.

UT Partner/Lead: Deborah Shmerler, Graphic Design

Cleveland Lead/ Support:
Corey Divel, Planner, Development & Engineering Services
Bryan Turner, Building Official, Development & Engineering Services
Teresa Torbett, Community Development Coordinator, Development & Engineering Services
Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Plan for Sidewalks on Inman Street from Broad Street to Keith Street.

Project Outcomes: Sidewalk Plan (Keith Street to Broad Street): A planning report that: examines alternatives for driveways and parking utilizing adjacent streets; addresses Inman Street and adjacent streets to integrate transit, pedestrian, and bicycle modes into the corridor; considers realistic redevelopment alternatives for the corridor; addresses particular needs related to traffic volume and speed, pedestrian crossings, drainage, etc.; and that discusses likely related services and costs such as irrigation, trash collection, cleaning, etc. Three-lane and four-lane alternative civil engineering designs that function within existing ROW. Streetscape sections with recommendations and specifications for signage, street furnishings, street trees, and other plantings consistent with the 2004 Downtown Master Plan, along with quantities and cost schedules.

UT Partner/Lead: Jenny Retherford, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Brian Beck, City Engineer
Greg Thomas (Coordinator), Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: A “Complete Streets” Plan for Reducing Lanes on Inman Street in the CBD. A Planning Study of Low-clearance Rail Underpass on Inman Street and possibilities for improvements.

Project Outcomes: “Complete Streets” Plan (CBD and Five Points) and Rail Underpass Study: Planning report with conceptual engineering design drawings of three-lane and four-lane alternatives including street cross sections and streetscape views. Streetscape sections with recommendations and specifications for signage, street furnishings, street trees, and other plantings consistent with the 2004 Downtown Master Plan, along with quantities and cost schedules. Evaluation of parking options within the design plans based upon the available space on Inman Street and in adjacent areas and upon the future mixture of uses within the area, e.g. short-term parking for businesses versus residential parking. Necessary services and costs such as irrigation, trash collection, cleaning, and similar considerations should be included in the plan report. The railroad underpass study would include descriptions and concept sketches of alternatives for increasing clearance and relative costs, impacts, and benefits. Plan drawings for roadway improvements alternatives proposed to allow through traffic to divert away from the redeveloped area of Inman Street in the CBD/Five Points without necessitating the use on the Central Avenue crossing for those moving to and from areas east of the railroad. A report on existing and anticipated future traffic and turning movements in and around the Inman Street corridor from Church Street to Wildwood Avenue. Concept drawings of treatments that could improve underpass aesthetics.

UT Partner/Lead: Jenny Retherford, Civil & Environmental Engineering

UT Center for Transportation Research Partner/Lead: Matthew Cate (Project Mentor), Tennessee Transportation Assistance Program (TTAP) Technical Assistance Coordinator

Cleveland Lead/Support: David Sheely, Assistant City Engineer Greg Thomas (Coordinator), Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: A Gateway and Streetscape Plan for Inman Street from the Railroad to the APD-40 By-pass.

Project Outcomes: Gateway and Streetscape Plan: Concept drawings for streetscape, especially along the western portion from Bates Pike back to the railroad, and quantities and costs for sidewalks, street trees, lighting, bus stops, street furnishings, and similar amenities. Recommendations for strategic assembling of land, creation of parking opportunities behind the Inman Street block faces, and other such elements as may be necessary to support redevelopment.

UT Partner/Lead: Brad Collett, Landscape Architecture

Cleveland Lead/Support: Brian Turner, Building Inspector Greg Thomas (Coordinator), Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Sidewalk Planning for Blythe Avenue and the Wildwood/Dalton Pike Area Neighborhoods

Student Work Description: Students will complete a comparative analysis and provide Cleveland with at least three alternative routes for sidewalk construction for a section of Blythe Avenue. Students will conduct a sidewalk planning exercise to evaluate alternative routes for connecting adjacent neighborhoods to the Wildwood Avenue/Dalton Pike The resulting report could become a supporting basis for future federal funding requests to the MPO by the city.

Project Outcomes: Sidewalk Plan and Construction Documents: Blythe Avenue sidewalk extension plan will focus on a convenient route for neighborhood residents and dealing with various physical constraints while working with an existing neighborhood organizations, and construction documents will facilitate the building of the planned sidewalk. Wildwood/Dalton Pike Area sidewalk planning seeks to determine logical pedestrian connections for adjacent neighborhoods to sidewalks along the main corridor. The focus is on the development of sidewalk alternatives and priorities considering various routes, the access provided by these various alternatives, and their impacts in terms of costs, utilities, drainage, etc.

UT Partner/Lead: Chris Cherry, Civil & Environmental Engineering Jenny Retherford, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Cleveland Lead/Support: Brian Beck, City Engineer David Sheely, Assistant City Engineer

Student Work Description: Students will research, document and analyze the existing physical condition of the Woolen Mill Branch Corridor and develop conceptual restoration and design proposals to make up a Greenway Vision Plan for the identified area.

Project Outcomes: Plan Report and Graphics: Inventory and analysis of existing physical condition of the corridor and its context (narrative and graphics), as well as other relevant systems and conditions affecting future restoration and development as a pedestrian greenway and stormwater infrastructure. From the inventory and analysis, identify feasible levels of intervention along the Woolen Mill Branch Corridor, including programmatic proposals and focus areas for detailed design development, including study of precedents. Prepare conceptual restoration and design proposals for areas of the Woolen Mill Branch corridor where interventions have been determined feasible with emphasis on sustainable urban design and green infrastructure. Proposals will focus on strategic programming and the planning/design of the physical environment, infrastructure, landscape elements, and their performance benefits. Concepts will be communicated graphically using methods such as diagrams, plans, sections, and illustrative perspectives as determined appropriate, as well as supporting narrative.

UT Partner/Lead: Brad Collett, Landscape Architecture Cleveland/Bradley County Chamber of Commerce Lead/Support: Doug Berry, Vice President, Economic Development

Cleveland Lead/Support:

Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will research and provide planning information to inform design criteria for bus shelters as well as strategies for paying for the shelters in accordance to the updated transit plan developed by the Cleveland Urban Area Transit System.

Project Outcomes: Reports and (possible) bus shelter design and prototype: Report updating needs assessment based upon recent stakeholder input on service gaps and priorities for routes, stops, and shelters; report describing a recommended process for collaborative transit planning review; report on how bus shelter design process was informed by planning beginning with basic questions like “where do we put shelters?” and “how must the shelters perform?” (Possible) Design studio report incorporating marketing and branding class work in study of how similar-size cities address sustainable transit needs; develop bus shelter design alternatives leading to a full-scale prototype for installation.

UT Partner/Lead: Chris Cherry, Civil & Environmental Engineering Tricia Stuth, Architecture

Cleveland Lead/Support: Robert Varnell, Assistant Director, Cleveland Urban Area Transit System

Student Work Description: Students will research and provide a collaborative design document including the historical information on the property and a compilation of the design and development options for the city to move forward with its revitalization plans for the historic Cherokee Hotel.

Project Outcomes: Collaborative Design Document: Produce a collaborative design document including the historical information on the property and a compilation of the design and development options. Following research of the history of the Cherokee Hotel, develop design concepts to return the existing facility back to its original historical character while maintaining a balance of downtown hotel rooms and potential upper floor condominiums. Move forward the revitalization plans for the Cherokee Hotel as previously conceived since its inclusion in the 2004 Downtown Cleveland Master Plan developed by Ross/Fowler. Assist in creating a downtown historic district with the efforts of the Southeast Tennessee Development District (SETDD) currently working on the initial applications for the National Park Service and the individual nomination for the Cherokee Hotel/Cleveland Summit site.

UT Partner/Lead: Mary Beth Robinson, Interior Design

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Sharon Marr, Executive Director, Mainstreet Cleveland
Doug Caywood, Managing Principal– Cleveland Office, The Lewis Group Architects

Student Work Description: Students will develop and conduct a survey of the physical conditions of the housing in the Central City Area and CDBG target area, including the Blythe Avenue area, Wildwood Avenue area, and eastern portions of Inman Street, in an effort to better direct public and private resources for housing and neighborhood improvement.

Project Outcomes: Survey Tool, Training Materials, Initial Implementation, and Report: Develop a survey tool and process that can be used with minimal training to rate the physical condition of housing units/structures through a windshield survey. Training materials for the survey process and tool that presents several applications of the tool to housing units in different structure types and in different states of repair. Conduct the survey and rating within the defined area and provide maps and tabular data to present the findings. A Housing Conditions Report for the defined geographic area that presents the findings of the housing conditions ratings analyzed along with the supplementary data.

UT Partner/Lead: Tim Ezzel, Political Science 

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Tanya Young, Engineering Technician
Bryan Turner, Building Inspector
Teresa Torbett, Grants Coordinator

Student Work Description: Students will conduct a needs assessment and provide design proposals to the BCHD to improve their staff’s efficiency through the design of their interior spaces. These proposals will later be used to assist the BCHD in their construction fundraising efforts.

Project Outcomes: Design Proposals: Bradley County Health Department will receive design proposals in order to make informed decisions about improvements to existing cramped and worn facilities; educate the public about the value of public health services, and improve funding efforts with potential donors and public officials. The design proposal process will consist of these elements: a needs assessment, making recommendations to the BCHD to improve their clinical and administrative staff’s efficiency through design of their interior spaces; a design program, listing each room required, size, dimension and required adjacency; a schematic floor plan showing the spatial organization of the new BCHD design; and a design proposal and detailed design drawings (including, plans, sections, elevations, schedules, renderings and finishes.)

UT Partner/Lead: Liz Teston, Interior Design

Bradley County Health Department Lead/Support:
Eloise Waters, County Director
Glenn Czarnecki, Regional Director
Roxanne Wooten, Community Services

Student Work Description: Students will conduct research and develop four distinct work products analyzing, studying and planning for the future redevelopment or adaptive reuse of strategically identified and selected sites within the City of Cleveland as an opportunity to accommodate anticipated economic (jobs) and population growth, thus mitigating adverse impacts of conventional sprawl patterned growth to scenic and productive landscapes.

Project Outcomes: Brownfield Area Redevelopment Plan: The plan process will have four major components:

  1. Redevelopment Inventory and Analysis –research regulatory, economic, social, and environmental systems determined to be relevant to brownfield remediation and redevelopment of the identified properties, and report findings in a graphic format with supporting narrative;
  2. Site Identification and Selection Study – Based on completed inventory and analysis, students will identify sites appropriate for redevelopment and/or adaptive reuse, and strategic sites will be selected for planning and design study;
  3. Programming and Precedent Studies – develop programmatic proposals for selected sites and prepare case studies of built precedents related to the proposals; and
  4. Redevelopment Vision Plans –prepare conceptual redevelopment proposals, and when appropriate, brownfield remediation plans for strategically identified and selected sites/districts in the City of Cleveland.

The 90 acre Whirlpool site and surrounding area will be the primary focus of the class’ design study for which multiple proposals will be prepared, though additional sites/ districts elsewhere in the city may also be identified for design and planning study. Contemporary strategies in sustainable urban design shall be emphasized. Proposals will focus on strategic programming and the planning/design of the physical environment, including building massing, infrastructure, and landscape elements. Concepts will be communicated graphically using methods such as diagrams, plans, sections, and illustrative perspectives as determined appropriate, as well as supporting narrative. The phased deployment of proposed remediation and redevelopment strategies will be explored through phasing studies for each project.

UT Partner/Lead: Brad Collett, Landscape Architecture

Cleveland/Bradley County Chamber of Commerce Lead/Support: Doug Berry, Vice President, Economic Development

Cleveland Lead/Support: Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will assess the market for a temporary ice skating rink in downtown Cleveland, including site, positive and negative impact, rink size, period of operation, requirements for installation, operation and site restoration, and economic impact.

Project Outcomes: Cost/Benefit Analysis: Determine the feasibility of a temporary ice skating rink in downtown Cleveland. Determine if the ice skating rink will create more activity in downtown and draw customers into the area for retailers and restaurants. Determine the best model for providing the temporary ice skating rink, including site requirements, alternative technologies, and business and operating characteristics. The City will be able to make an informed decision regarding the cost/benefits that a temporary ice skating rink will offer to the community and downtown business owners while determining the market for the rink, e.g. Lee University students, tourists, etc.

UT Partner/Lead: Ben Compton, Economics

Cleveland Lead/Support: Sharon Marr, Executive Director, Mainstreet Cleveland

Student Work Description: Students will provide a written report detailing measured impacts of Cleveland’s current and potential future plans that also details best practices for Cleveland to improve energy, environment, mobility, and communication within the city. This will include identification of strengths and weaknesses in relation to energy, environment, mobility, and communication development, as well as potential paths to take to build upon strengths and address weaknesses.

Project Outcomes: Planning Report: Analyze the benefits of living in Cleveland, Tennessee with particular consideration of four interconnected development sectors: energy (fuel resources and infrastructures powering all we make and do), environment (the natural systems supporting our lives and our transformation of these systems through the built environment), mobility (moving people and goods), and communication (transfer of information between people, overcoming barriers posed by time, distance and/or limitations of human capacity). These four sectors are considered together because it is assumed that as an urban area improves one, the other three also improve. Identify strengths to build upon and weaknesses to address in relation to energy, environment, mobility, and communication within the city of Cleveland. Investigate Cleveland’s past planning efforts and current development trajectory. Consider stakeholder views, community visions, and apply them to an energy, environment, mobility, and communication development matrix. Specifically consider what steps and/or efforts will encourage citizens to make decisions that support urban-living. Identify keys to optimize development for Cleveland within energy, environment, mobility and communication sectors. Measure the potential for improvements across the development matrix. Produce a final report that highlights Cleveland’s measured potential to improve energy, environment, mobility, and communication while achieving development goals that fit within the current development trajectory and citizen outlook in Cleveland.

UT Bredeson Center/ORNL Partner/Lead: Bhudu Bhaduri, Geography Kathleen Hauser, (Course Coordinator)

Cleveland Lead/Support: Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Student Work Description: Students will plan and implement a public participation program for four of the SCI planning projects involving neighborhood residents potentially impacted by these proposed physical planning projects. Project Outcomes: Public Involvement and Neighborhood Capacity Building: Lee University students and faculty will work in parallel fashion with UT efforts. Plan and implement a public participation program for Redevelopment Area SCI projects (Blythe Avenue sidewalk extension and Wildwood/Dalton Pike neighbor connector sidewalks, brownfield area redevelopment plan, gateway and streetscape plan on East Inman Street) Report on neighborhood involvement in the planning process including data on numbers of people participating in the process, and the level of engagement. Facilitate communication between neighborhood residents and other stakeholders with UT participants and others concerning project background data, assumptions, issues, concerns, and alternatives to affect the shape of project plans, and document the results of this dialogue. For neighborhood participants translate skills and principles that can be transferred to comparable issues and situations faced by the neighborhood going forward (this could take the form of a skills curriculum and certificate or something similar). This process should be built somewhat on proven community development theory and practice and, where possible, employ metrics that would be known and understood by community development professionals. Assess further organizational development needs of existing neighborhood association(s) and provision of technical assistance for further growth and development. Assist interested participants who lack a neighborhood association and provide training and resource materials for the development of a neighborhood association and establishment of mentoring contact with Impact Cleveland or another appropriate organization for the development of the neighborhood association.

Lee University Partner/Lead: Arlie Tagayuna, Sociology

Cleveland Lead/Support:
Corey Divel, Planner, Development & Engineering Services
Greg Thomas, Planning Director, Development & Engineering Services

Impact Cleveland Lead/Support: Dustin Tommey, Community Development Director

Student Work Description: Student involvement, if any, is undetermined at this time.

Project Outcomes: Access Management Plan Study and Scope of Work: Working in cooperation with TDOT and the Cleveland MPO, the CTR would produce an access management plan study for the SR60 corridor that would evaluate examples of different access management techniques and their application in other locales under conditions similar to those that exist in the various links along the SR60 Corridor that are under study by the State Route 60 Corridor Management Committee. Data generated by the study would be useful in evaluating access management concerns in other corridors within TDOT jurisdiction. The project would also entail a detailed needs analysis and scope of work for completing the SR60 access management plan in a way that accommodates different modes along the corridor.

UT Center for Transportation Research Partner/Lead: Mareike Ortmann, Research Associate

Tennessee Department of Transportation Lead/Support: Greg Thomas, Municipal Planning Office Coordinator

The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System and partner in the Tennessee Transfer Pathway.

Report an accessibility barrier